Dragon Mountain® Roller Coaster – The Ride

Your ride on Dragon Mountain roller coaster begins with a walk through a massive dragon’s open mouth, down into a mysterious, cavernous loading station. From the edge of the platform, you will step into one of the seven-car, 28 passenger coaster trains. You are secured in place with a padded overhead shoulder bar.

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Leaving the station, the train descends deeper underground and enters a 14-foot diameter tunnel. Coming out into daylight as it starts its 386 foot climb to the top of the huge lift at a 27 degree angle, it reaches the crest of the mountain veers left and screams down the first hill at 47 degrees and back up into the double vertical loops.

Dragon Mountain

Coming out of the second loop, you arc to the right, then fly into the first of two horizontal spirals as they work their way deeper into the bowels of the earth. A 92-foot diameter spiral is centered just above the 104-foot spiral forming an inverted cone. You roar into the daylight and bank around a broad horseshoe curve before plunging again into a tunnel (1,163 feet of tunnels in total – more than any other coaster in the world) and then disappearing into the mountain wall.

As you leave the tunnel, you are suddenly hurled into the final white-knuckle thrill – the bowtie – two staggered loops which will turn you upside down twice within seconds.

A fitting climax to a fantastic ride! Ready to ride it again?

FACT SHEET

Dragon Mountain is a world-class roller coaster, at Marineland, Niagara Falls, Canada.

* One of the longest non-stop coaster rides in the world.

* Maximum speed of the ride is up to 50 miles per hour.

* At 5,500 feet, one of the longest steel coaster rides ever built.

* Features more tunnels – 1,163 feet – than any other
coaster in the world.

* Spread over 30 acres of land – largest ever.

* One of the highest in North America – 186 feet high.

* Thrilling speed perception first coaster ever to hug the contours
of a man-made mountain.

* Lift length and angle – 386 feet at 27 degrees.

* 86 foot loops.

* Diameters of double spirals are 92 feet and 104 feet.

* 48” height requirement

Are Bears Really Anti-Social?

Bears are generally thought of as strictly anti-social, solitary animals, but this is not correct. Habitat impediments, such as range size, prevent bears from interacting with each other very often in the wild. When they do meet competition for food or a mate can result in an encounter that is rather hostile. However, when competition for food or a mate is absent, bears have been known to strike up friendly relationships with each other and have even been observed playing together for long periods of time. This play typically takes the form of wrestling matches. Such play behaviour is often interpreted as aggression when it’s just two bears deciding to have some fun.

BearsWrestling

It’s true that bears do not live in herds or packs, but they can and do co-exist in close proximity to each other where food sources are plentiful and their numbers high. They will share home ranges with other bears by establishing a social hierarchy based on size, age and disposition. A bear will establish and maintain its place in the hierarchy by posturing or acting aggressively. In most cases these exhibitions of aggression do not escalate to a full-fledged altercation against another individual with the less dominant bear eventually backing down.

The stone structure located in Marineland's Bear Country is quite large and contains many caves and tunnels providing the bears with shade and protection from bad weather.

The stone structure located in Marineland’s Bear Country is quite large and contains many caves and tunnels providing the bears with shade and protection from bad weather.

To go from living solitary to living social shows the ability of the bear to adapt its behaviour based on changes to its environment.

Contrary to popular belief, the solitary bear is not SO solitary.

What’s On The Menu?

Well, anything from herring to hay. Marineland provides wholesome, nutritious and palatable foods to all of our animals under the expert direction of our veterinary staff.

All of our marine mammals are fed restaurant quality herring, capelin and squid. In fact, you could take some home, cook it up and have it for dinner.

fishOur black bears receive a balanced diet of fish, fresh fruits, meats and vegetables. Yum!

Our deer, bison and elk dine only on hay that is of top quality. How much hay? Would you believe 110 bales per day?

For members of our deer family, hay is fed in conjunction with grains such as oats, corn and barley.

 

Field Trip? Let’s Go!

There are countless opportunities to learn at Marineland, but did you know you can make it part of the curriculum outcomes for students from grades one through eight?

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Quit Bearin’ Around!

Just like Marineland, black bears go dormant through the winter. But that doesn’t mean either one stops being active altogether. We continue to feed our bears throughout the winter months to help ensure they’re vibrant and healthy when spring arrives. Continue reading

They’ll Earn your Seal of Approval!

Found along the shores of the north Atlantic from New Jersey to Norway, Grey Seals have a strong population that’s growing in numbers. The largest colony in the world is located at Sable Island in Nova Scotia, but you don’t have to visit that remote location to see these playful creatures.

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