Dragon Mountain® Roller Coaster – The Ride

Your ride on Dragon Mountain roller coaster begins with a walk through a massive dragon’s open mouth, down into a mysterious, cavernous loading station. From the edge of the platform, you will step into one of the seven-car, 28 passenger coaster trains. You are secured in place with a padded overhead shoulder bar.

DragonMountain-clr

Leaving the station, the train descends deeper underground and enters a 14-foot diameter tunnel. Coming out into daylight as it starts its 386 foot climb to the top of the huge lift at a 27 degree angle, it reaches the crest of the mountain veers left and screams down the first hill at 47 degrees and back up into the double vertical loops.

Dragon Mountain

Coming out of the second loop, you arc to the right, then fly into the first of two horizontal spirals as they work their way deeper into the bowels of the earth. A 92-foot diameter spiral is centered just above the 104-foot spiral forming an inverted cone. You roar into the daylight and bank around a broad horseshoe curve before plunging again into a tunnel (1,163 feet of tunnels in total – more than any other coaster in the world) and then disappearing into the mountain wall.

As you leave the tunnel, you are suddenly hurled into the final white-knuckle thrill – the bowtie – two staggered loops which will turn you upside down twice within seconds.

A fitting climax to a fantastic ride! Ready to ride it again?

FACT SHEET

Dragon Mountain is a world-class roller coaster, at Marineland, Niagara Falls, Canada.

* One of the longest non-stop coaster rides in the world.

* Maximum speed of the ride is up to 50 miles per hour.

* At 5,500 feet, one of the longest steel coaster rides ever built.

* Features more tunnels – 1,163 feet – than any other
coaster in the world.

* Spread over 30 acres of land – largest ever.

* One of the highest in North America – 186 feet high.

* Thrilling speed perception first coaster ever to hug the contours
of a man-made mountain.

* Lift length and angle – 386 feet at 27 degrees.

* 86 foot loops.

* Diameters of double spirals are 92 feet and 104 feet.

* 48” height requirement

Are Bears Really Anti-Social?

Bears are generally thought of as strictly anti-social, solitary animals, but this is not correct. Habitat impediments, such as range size, prevent bears from interacting with each other very often in the wild. When they do meet competition for food or a mate can result in an encounter that is rather hostile. However, when competition for food or a mate is absent, bears have been known to strike up friendly relationships with each other and have even been observed playing together for long periods of time. This play typically takes the form of wrestling matches. Such play behaviour is often interpreted as aggression when it’s just two bears deciding to have some fun.

BearsWrestling

It’s true that bears do not live in herds or packs, but they can and do co-exist in close proximity to each other where food sources are plentiful and their numbers high. They will share home ranges with other bears by establishing a social hierarchy based on size, age and disposition. A bear will establish and maintain its place in the hierarchy by posturing or acting aggressively. In most cases these exhibitions of aggression do not escalate to a full-fledged altercation against another individual with the less dominant bear eventually backing down.

The stone structure located in Marineland's Bear Country is quite large and contains many caves and tunnels providing the bears with shade and protection from bad weather.

The stone structure located in Marineland’s Bear Country is quite large and contains many caves and tunnels providing the bears with shade and protection from bad weather.

To go from living solitary to living social shows the ability of the bear to adapt its behaviour based on changes to its environment.

Contrary to popular belief, the solitary bear is not SO solitary.

Accentuate the Positive…

 A look at Positive Reinforcement Reward System

 

After presentations, Marineland trainers love answering guest’s questions. The most common is, “how do you train your marine mammals?”

The trainers use a healthy and successful training technique called Positive Reinforcement Reward System.  This system respects the animal by using positive reinforcement, it never allows for punishment.

How does the positive reinforcement reward system work?

Every time an animal performs a behavior correctly the trainer blows a whistle signaling a perfect performance and the animal is rewarded. The animal is never punished for performing a behavior incorrectly; the trainer simply repeats the cue to encourage the animal to try again.

What rewards are used for positive reinforcement?

The reinforcement can be food, a tongue tickle, a back scratch, a belly rub or playtime where large rings and balls are placed in the pool.  While food is a reinforcement used, it is important to note that the animals receive all the food that they require to meet their dietary needs whether they perform the requested behavior or not.

 

Kelly & Apollo

A walrus getting a well-deserved back scratch

Beluga Playtime 2

A beluga enjoying playtime with a ball

What types of behaviours do the animals learn?

The trainers teach the animals a variety of behaviours like waving hello or crunching out a few sit-ups. But, there is another important set of behaviours the animals perform called “husbandry” behaviours. These actions help our veterinarians and marine mammal staff to monitor and maintain the health of the animals.

How long does training take?

Basic behaviours require a few months of training, elaborate behaviours require about two years of training. The process helps keep the animals mentally sharp and physically fit. Some learn faster than others and each animal has a unique style.

IMGP1907

A beluga and trainer working together

Marine Mammal Enrichment

Enriching the lives of our marine mammals is an integral part of animal care at Marineland and is as important as the nutrition and medical care that they receive. The act of providing stimulating and challenging environments, toys and activities for the animals is called enrichment. The benefits to the animals are many and include, but are not limited to, mental stimulation, physical activity and promotion of the animal’s natural behaviours like exploring, foraging and diving.

Ice Toy 1Ice Toy 3Ice Toy 2Generally, we divide enrichment into two main types: Environmental Enrichment Devices (EED) like toys, balls and brushes and Environmental Enrichment Activities (EEA) like giving a whale a full body water massage with a sprayer hose or playing peek-a-boo at the underwater glass. Who knew aluminum foil could be used like this!

Peek-A-Boo 1Smooshi PeekingSonja & Joce 2Sonja & Joce 1Sometimes, enrichment can actually be both a device and an activity – such as using a long-handled brush (a device) to rub the pectoral fins of a whale (an activity). Even feeding, training or husbandry procedures are viewed as enrichment activities and are treated in that manner so that we can make such activities exciting and stimulating for the animal.

Within each species there are wide ranges of individual preferences on what an animal enjoys, just like humans. Our caregivers devote a great deal of time and effort to get to know individual animals’ preferences in order to create activities and design devices that will engage and enthrall an animal.

When deciding if an EEA or EED is acceptable to use, the safety of the animal is paramount. In the case of EEDs several criteria need to be considered. Does the object have any rough edges? Is it sturdy enough to withstand salt, cold temperatures or the pounding from a 4,500 kg animal? Is it made of safe material? All of these questions and more are taken into account by our marine mammal care team. Marineland has an enrichment craftsman in our carpenter shop who can work with our marine mammal care team to design and build various EEDs as in some cases a suitable device just can’t be found at a store.

Enhancing the lives of the animals in our care is our top priority and enrichment plays a key role in helping us achieve that goal.

What’s On The Menu?

Well, anything from herring to hay. Marineland provides wholesome, nutritious and palatable foods to all of our animals under the expert direction of our veterinary staff.

All of our marine mammals are fed restaurant quality herring, capelin and squid. In fact, you could take some home, cook it up and have it for dinner.

fishOur black bears receive a balanced diet of fish, fresh fruits, meats and vegetables. Yum!

Our deer, bison and elk dine only on hay that is of top quality. How much hay? Would you believe 110 bales per day?

For members of our deer family, hay is fed in conjunction with grains such as oats, corn and barley.

 

DID YOU KNOW?… AMAZING WALRUS FACT

Male walruses and some female walruses have special air sacs in their necks that hold air (up to 50 litres) allowing them to keep their heads above water for extended periods of time – they can even sleep this way. Amazing!

The males also use the air sacs to produce a characteristic bell-like sound when courting female walruses.

The first picture shows Zeus without inflated air sacs and the second picture shows Zeus with inflated air sacs.

Zeus2Zeus Air Sac2

 

 

Field Trip? Let’s Go!

There are countless opportunities to learn at Marineland, but did you know you can make it part of the curriculum outcomes for students from grades one through eight?

Continue reading

Quit Bearin’ Around!

Just like Marineland, black bears go dormant through the winter. But that doesn’t mean either one stops being active altogether. We continue to feed our bears throughout the winter months to help ensure they’re vibrant and healthy when spring arrives. Continue reading

A Bison or a Buffalo?

If you want to see the potential damaging effects humans can have on animal populations – and the important role conservation efforts can have to reverse them – just take a look at the North American bison.

Continue reading

Cet-a-what now?

When it comes to Marineland’s marine mammals, it’s important to get them in the right order. For our whales and dolphins, that order is Cetacea.

Continue reading